" />
Mobile

The problem with social photo syncing

The problem with social photo syncing
piers.scott@sociable.co'

Last thanksgiving Americans shared over 10 million photos on Instagram – that’s a lot of vintage-looking turkeys.

As impressive as that number is it tells us two important things; first, it shows how the social web and the mobile web are getting closer; and second, it shows us that photography is becoming a core part of our sharing habits.

Google, Facebook, Dropbox, and Twitter have noticed this too.  As we’ve reported before, these sites have all issued major updates in the past 18 months designed to make it easier for us to upload, share, and interact with photographs.

They call it ‘seamless sharing’ but ‘indiscriminate sharing’ would be a more descriptive name for it.

Dropbox, Facebook, and Google+’s apps automatically upload all the photographs you take with your smartphone. Once online you can decide to share them, or delete them.  The problem is, content we delete from social providers remains on their servers for some time.

But what if you don’t want all of your photos automatically uploaded to these companies’ servers? Using their 20% time, two developers, Kyle and Antonie, working for the Irish digital agency Arekibo have started to tackle this problem.

They’re developed an app, called photoQ, which allows users to selectively upload their smartphone photographs to Facebook.  The aim of app is to give users more control over the images that they do upload to their Facebook account.

But we shouldn’t have to rely on third party developers, working in their own time, to give us back control over our own data.

Automatic photo uploading is convenient for us and our social providers but it shouldn’t be a binary, on-or-off, service.

As with our other data, we should have control over what we upload – if we decide that there are some photos that we want to sync and others that we don’t, we should have that ability.

Click to add a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Mobile
piers.scott@sociable.co'
@pdscott

Piers Dillon-Scott is co-editor of The Sociable and writes about stuff he finds. He likes technology, media, and using the Oxford comma (because it just makes sense).

More in Mobile

gay dating app

Transparent, secure gay dating app launches solution to catfishing that gets users Hookd

Tim HinchliffeJune 23, 2017
app features

5 Commonly Overlooked Features That Can Make or Break Your App’s Popularity

Vivek ShahJune 17, 2017
beautiful photos editor

Instagrammers Can Create, Share Aesthetically Beautiful Photos Like the Pros With All-in-one Editor

Tim HinchliffeJune 15, 2017
local coffee

Meet the platform looking to unite local coffee shop communities

Tim HinchliffeJune 8, 2017
mobile healthcare

How mobile app developers are transforming the healthcare industry

Ajit JainJune 5, 2017

Visual Storytelling Platform Chronicles, Preserves Our Collective History

Tim HinchliffeMay 24, 2017
kids app

How understanding cultural differences allows kids’ app developers to boost ratings

Tim HinchliffeMay 10, 2017
streaming

The Kayak of Online Streaming Platforms With One Algorithm to Rule Them All

Tim HinchliffeApril 26, 2017
mobile payment

How to Keep up on Mobile Payment Security as Societies Go Cashless

Mehul RajputApril 20, 2017