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Here’s why you’ll be running more Android apps on Windows 8 than Windows apps

Android apps running on Windows 8
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Soon after it launches in October Microsoft’s Windows 8 operating system might end up running more Android apps than Windows ones, or so AMD hopes.

Chip maker AMD has struck a deal with software maker Bluestack (which is an AMD-ventures backed company) that will allow Windows 8 devices to download and run the half a million apps available on Google’s Android OS via AMD’s APPZone.

It’s unclear how Microsoft feels about the development; reports are that the Windows 8 market will only come with 2,000 apps on launch, so access to Google’s Android Market will at least fill a gap.

Bluestack’s software will manage the translation for apps built for Android so they will work on Windows 8 laptops and desktops running on AMD chips.  Bluestack’s software also works with Intel chips but needs to be installed before use – the company says it is working with other PC makers to get the application pre-installed on laptops and PCs.

If you’re running Windows 7 you can try out Bluestack’s application now.

The amazingly titled Corporate Vice President of Heterogeneous Applications and Developer Solutions at AMD,Manju Hegde, said;

BlueStacks’ cross-platform innovation bridges the Android and x86 application ecosystems, providing new opportunities for developers and better experiences for users.

BlueStacks CEO Rosen Sharma described the results as “awesome,” adding “mobile apps run beautifully on [AMD-powered] machines.”

On AMD’s part the company says its chips will be able to upscale the apps, most of which will have been built for smartphones, to works clearly on desktop sized screens (Most Android apps haven’t made the leap to tablet-sized device yet).  It says its system will allow users to synchronise apps between desktop and smartphone/tablet platforms.

Getting the software instilled during manufacturing will be key to ensuring the process is seamless for users but as desktop machines have a longer usage life than mobile devices will Bluestack’s technology be needed in the long term?

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Piers Dillon Scott
Piers Dillon-Scott is co-editor of The Sociable and writes about stuff he finds. He likes technology, media, and using the Oxford comma (because it just makes sense).