Technology

Magic mushrooms as a cyberdelic technology for hacking consciousness

There are many parallels between the psychedelic experience and how computers & modern technology operate.

magic mushrooms technology consciousness hacking
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Magic mushrooms are like a technology for hacking consciousness that connect users to a web of infinite information where they can download hidden wisdom.

If you think of magic mushrooms as a sort of cyberdelic technology for consciousness hacking, you will find that there are many parallels between the psychedelic experience and how computers and modern technology operate.

A cyberdelic Library of Alexandria is available to anyone who traverses these invisible landscapes and is able to penetrate that ever-present firewall called the ego.

To illustrate my point of psilocybin being a technology, I’ll start slow at the onset before shooting straight up to the peak of the argument, and then gradually come back to reality with the wisdom learned.

Virtual Reality onset

During the onset, the magic mushroom experience is like looking through a lens of virtual reality.

It makes notable enhancements on your senses. Your eyesight seems to be more acute, colors appear more vibrant, and later your peripheral vision is fine-tuned.

For example, four hours after ingesting 3.5 grams of Psilocybe cubensis earlier this month, I was able to detect an opossum crawling from a tree branch to my roof from 30 feet away in the dead of night out of the corner of my eye while my gaze was firmly fixed on the fire in front of me!

“Answers lie on the periphery; they have ‘peripherential’ treatment” — The Mushroom

In this way, psilocybin is a particularly helpful technology that augments your physical abilities that give you an evolutionary-like survival advantage in fight or flight situations.

Some shamans even give psychedelics to their pets to sharpen their senses for hunting!

The visual enhancement is like looking into virtual reality goggles and experiencing another layer of perception, and I assure you, the analogy intensifies with the dose.

Let’s move on and log on to the Logos, shall we?

Logging on to the information superhighway of the ‘Logos’

With computers, we log onto the internet. With magic mushrooms, we log onto the ether, the other, the source, or the Logos — – the informative, divine voice that teaches wisdom to those who seek it.

What I’m trying to say here is that there is a whole database of information available to us if we are able to connect with it through altered states of consciousness, and this usually arrives during the peak of the magic mushroom journey and stays through the finish.

“A question is a seed. Plant it. Its fruits shall be your answers” — The Mushroom

This source of information speaks in words and in visual patterns. It is greater in size and scope than anything that has ever been uploaded to the internet, and it is the source from which the likes of Francis Crick, Carl Jung, Nikola Tesla, and countless Silicon Valley developers have tapped into over the years for their groundbreaking contributions to society.

Psilocybin connects the user to a type of information superhighway like the internet, but the psychedelic “network” for lack of a better term, transmits information to the “bemushroomed” user that cannot be found through conventional technological means.

The result is a complete download of information that you could never access under normal, everyday states of consciousness.

Breaking through the ‘ego firewall’

However, not everyone that takes the entheogen (something that produces divinity within) can communicate with this being, entity, reality, or whatever you want to call it.

There is a firewall that prevents psilocybin from giving you access to the great, invisible network of prophetic wisdom, and that is the ego.

The ego is the firewall that blocks psilocybin from allowing you to communicate with the other, which has also been described as the Logos.

“We could see how we are a part of everything” — The Mushroom

Luckily, at higher doses, psilocybin breaks through that ego firewall because it dissolves boundaries — it paralyzes the ego temporarily, so that the user becomes one with the experience. There is no self. There is no “I” at higher doses. Everything is one. Duality is an illusion. There is no separation between anything.

If the ego firewall is too strong, it will try to control the experience, and this is where so-called bad trips can occur. Better to surrender.

This is what the mushroom has taught me over 17 years of exploration. Once the ego is dissolved, the Logos speaks. When the Logos speaks, the listener receives its mystical downloads.

Mystical downloads from an unknown source

Our ordinary, problem-solving state of consciousness places an emphasis on identifying problems to solve. Through the technology of psilocybin, problem-solving is less of a task and more of a revelation.

“When infinite intelligence presents itself, there are no questions to be asked” — The Mushroom

I’ll give an example from my most recent magic mushroom journey from earlier this month.

I wrote my experience as it happened in my journal, time-stamping each entry, with one hour missing where I went into the woods and completely lost my mind for awhile.

When I emerged three hours after ingestion, I begin to receive downloads that took on the language of mystical writings.

“A question is a seed. Plant it. Its fruits shall be your answers,” was one such download.

The phrase came instantaneously, it was never formulated in my mind before I began writing. It just came out that way on paper and only reading it later after the trip ended did I realize what I had written.

Before that phrase “magically” appeared on the page, I was seeing visions — what you might call hallucinations.

I saw everything around me as a sort of library or encyclopedia that was present everywhere, 360 degrees of information. Think of yourself in the middle of a bubble or a sphere. Everywhere you look, information comes pouring in.

These types of informational downloads from a non-physical source are common among psychonauts.

Rerouting circuits to make new connections for problem-solving

As a technology for problem-solving, the mushroom experience led me to the realization that solutions were everywhere to any given problem.

There’s a reason why people say you have to “find” the solution — it’s because it really is just waiting there to be found.

Bob Dylan was on to something when he sang, “The answer my friend is blowin’ in the wind. The answer is blowin’ in the wind.”

In a bemushroomed state, “finding” the answer to anything is as simple as looking around you, especially when out in nature. Then, prophetic phrases just appear out of nowhere.

When you begin to understand cause and effect — how one thing is part of a system that connects to other systems — what you are left with is a giant, 360 degree canvass (your field of vision) of processes in motion.

“Patterns manifest. Systems intertwine. Problems do not exist” — The Mushroom

If you see a “problem” in one area, you can simultaneously see its “solution” in another.

Where you might be tempted to focus on solving the problem found in one area, you can see that it has already been taken care of in another.

It’s just a matter of time before the solution presents itself when those connections interact. It’s like seeing the future through the natural augmented reality — psilocybin.

In that respect, problems don’t exist. Problems are a human construct.

So, what the mushroom taught me is that it is better to be mindful and to try to fully understand or see how things work first before attempting to solve them or meddle with them in some way.

We create our own problems, and if ever find ourselves stuck in trying to find a solution, it may very well be that we need to rethink the problem and whether it really is a problem to begin with.

Psilocybin is a habit-breaking defrag tool for the mind

One of the most transformative properties of the psychedelic is that it is believed to cause neuroplasticity and neurogenesis in the brain. What this means is that it changes the pathways by which different parts of the brain communicate with each other.

The brain makes new connections, thus it forms new ways of thinking and problem solving while altering old habits and ways of thinking that had been previously hardwired in our brains.

It breaks habits while opening the “user” up to more creative ways of doing things.

“You don’t have to be useful all the time. Better to be mindful” — The Mushroom

What does this have to do with technology?

Think of it like the defragmentation tool on a computer. In the good old days, whenever my computer was running slow or continuously got stuck, I would run the defrag tool to consolidate, organize, and optimize the system, so it could run smoother.

I think a similar thing occurs with higher doses of magic mushrooms.

Psilocybin is like a habit-breaking defrag tool for the mind.

After the mind is defragged with the psilocybin defrag tool, and the ego firewall is bypassed, it opens up the possibility for a faster, more direct communication with “the network” and its voice assistant — the Logos.

Psilocybin is nature’s augmented reality with a voice assistant

Here are some of the things the mushroom told me concerning mindfulness, action vs inaction, and “problem-solving” through simple observation.

“When infinite intelligence presents itself, there are no questions to be asked.”

“Moments of lucidity are only good for lucidity’s sake.”

“You don’t have to be useful all the time. Better to be mindful.”

“Usefulness is only useful when it needs to be used.

“If we were more alert with our senses, but open with our souls, we could see how we are a part of everything. Patterns manifest. Systems intertwine. Problems do not exist.”

“All there is is unity and love/understanding.”

To me these downloads combined sound similar to the advice that Krishna gave Arjuna in the Hindu text, the “Bhagavad Gita,” and the deeper wisdom behind knowing when it is time to act and when it is time not to act.

These are just some of the takeaways from my most recent journey into the mystic, but I don’t believe they are just the ramblings of a drug-addled psychonaut.

After hitting the peak of the magic mushroom trip, which occurs at about two or three hours after ingestion, the user whose ego has been tranquilized begins to receive messages from the Logos — nature’s own voice assistant.

Solutions to problems automatically appear as thoughts which come fully formed in language, and that language tends to be messianic in nature — it sounds like something from the Bible.

Can you imagine hearing something like that coming from Cortana, Siri, or Alexa?

User: “Alexa, what is a question?”

Alexa: “A question is a seed.”

The lessons received from the mushroom trip are not like a typical learning system where you have to study and memorize something, but rather a complete download and software update for your body, mind, and soul.

When you read old axioms, proverbs, religious texts, and aphorisms you begin to think my god! these people were high out of their minds!

But I have no doubt in my mind that sages of old were experiencing altered states of consciousness, whether through psychedelics, meditation, rhythmic drumming, or even extreme pain or exhaustion through performing certain rituals.

“Usefulness is only useful when it needs to be used” — The Mushroom

Magic mushrooms and other entheogens are nature’s augmented reality. They not only show you a different reality, but they tell you about it as well.

The psychedelic experience offered by magic mushrooms mimics technology in a way that allows the users to hack consciousness by connecting them to an anonymous network where they can download its mystical messages.

Through my personal experiences, I fully believe that the psychedelic experience with psilocybin is like a technology for hacking consciousness, but that’s only just one dimension of the sacred mushroom experience.

Digital Immortality and the Book of the Dead

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Tim Hinchliffe
Tim Hinchliffe is the editor of The Sociable. His passions include writing about how technology impacts society and the parallels between Artificial Intelligence and Mythology. Previously, he was a reporter for the Ghanaian Chronicle in West Africa and an editor at Colombia Reports in South America. tim@sociable.co