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What should you do if you think your Credit Card details have been hacked?

Sony Credit Card
Sony Credit Card Credit:Sony
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Today Sony will reveal details of how their PlayStation Network and Qriocity music service were hacked (Read our earlier report here).  But if you are one of the millions of Sony customers who fears their Credit Card details have been hacked what should you do? (some reports suggest that over 2.2 millions credit cards have been leaked while in Ireland alone some 250,000 users’ accounts have reportedly been compromised)

We spoke to the Bank of Ireland to see what Credit Card users should if they believe their personal details have been compromised.

Sony Credit Card
Sony Credit Card Credit:Sony

The first thing to do is not to panic, if you believe that your Credit Card details have been made public, whether by a hack such as this, or through another method you should contact your bank as soon as you can.  A reputable bank will have a “Card Services” department contactable by telephone or email which will investigate case of a possible information leak.

Have a look out for data protection documents on your bank’s website or local branch and keep this information to hand.  Bank of Ireland says,  “Any case of fraud identified will be investigated and on the basis that, if a compromise is proven as the reason of the fraud, we can assure customers they will not be liable for these transactions.”

The bank says that customers needn’t cancel their Credit Cards.  The best course of action is to monitor your bank account online or through your bank statements and, if you notice any unauthorised transactions, to contact your bank.

Over the past decade banks around the world have developed “robust security systems” to detect fraudulent Credit Card  use and to prevent such illegal use of Credit Cards online.  These are a closely guarded industry secret and are constantly being adapted to deal with changes in hackers’ operations and advances in technology.

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Piers Dillon Scott
Piers Dillon-Scott is co-editor of The Sociable and writes about stuff he finds. He likes technology, media, and using the Oxford comma (because it just makes sense).