Government and Policy

WEF to inaugurate urban transformation hub with summit in Detroit

The unelected globalist urban transformation agenda risks turning cities into digital surveillance hubs: perspective

Spirit of Detroit. Photo by Nicholas Domingo
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Birthplace of the automotive industry and home to the world’s largest Masonic temple, the city of Detroit is where the World Economic Forum (WEF) is laying the cornerstone for its urban transformation hub with an inaugural summit in December.

From December 6-8, the WEF will launch the Center for Urban Transformation in Detroit, Michigan with a three-day Urban Transformation Summit.

“The first annual Urban Transformation Summit in Detroit will bring together city executives with private, philanthropic and community leaders to catalyze collaborations that will drive action on the most critical issues facing cities today,” the event page reads.

Why is the WEF focusing on cities?

“Cities are the bedrock of the global economy and home to a growing majority of the world’s population. As global challenges increase—from COVID-19 to climate change—cities are on the frontline” — WEF Urban Transformation Summit

According to the WEF, “By 2030 the urban population is expected to be 5 billion, with 600 cities generating more than 60% of global gross domestic product. While cities are drivers of growth and innovation, they are also at the forefront of global challenges, from affordable housing to climate change.”

Additionally, “Cities are the bedrock of the global economy and home to a growing majority of the world’s population. As global challenges increase—from COVID-19 to climate change—cities are on the frontline. Their ability to weather current and future crises will shape economic futures and the livelihoods of billions.”

Gratiot Site Plans, Image Source: Bedrock

Speaking of “bedrock,” Detroit’s largest real estate company, Bedrock, will host the WEF’s new Center for Urban Transformation, which will provide “a testbed to rethink and redefine the benefits and possibilities of urban living,” according to a WEF Agenda announcement.

The Center for Urban Transformation will base its activities in Bedrock’s downtown Detroit portfolio with future intentions to join the developer’s plans for the Gratiot Site.

From there, “Additional work will be led out of the World Economic Forum’s offices in Beijing, Geneva, Mumbai, New York, San Francisco and Tokyo.”

“New models for public-private cooperation and shared community services are also changing the way in which cities provide services to residents and business, blurring the lines between government and the private sector” — WEF Shaping the Future of Urban Transformation Platform

Whether it’s urban transformation, the pandemic, or climate change, the globalist agenda is to always blur the line between the public and private sectors.

According to the WEF’s “Shaping the Future of Urban Transformationplatform, “New models for public-private cooperation and shared community services are also changing the way in which cities provide services to residents and business, blurring the lines between government and the private sector.”

What unelected globalist agenda would be complete without the marriage of corporation and state?

For the Davos elites, urban transformation is about turning cities into digital surveillance hubs where sensors, cameras, and connected devices are deployed to monitor and modify behavior as a means to address the perceived challenges of climate change and outdated infrastructure.

Data is the most valuable asset.

If climate lockdowns and other restrictions ever become widespread in cities, the Internet of Things (IoT) will be an invaluable tool for mass surveillance and enforcement that will go hand in hand with digital identity schemes.

For example, the WEF recently highlighted how London’s “Ultra Low Emission Zone” works, stating:

“You drive in. You are captured – a picture of your number plate – and somebody checks it against the database and is able to check, using details provided to that database, whether you have a compliant car. So it checks whether you’re a Euro 4 petrol car or a Euro 6 diesel. If you are not, then you have to pay £12.50. And if you’ve not paid £12.50 then you are given a fine.”

With respect to urban transformation, the IoT will have a major role to play in the coming decade.

 “Welcome to the year 2030. Welcome to my city – or should I say, ‘our city.’ I don’t own anything. I don’t own a car. I don’t own a house. I don’t own any appliances or any clothes” — WEF-authored article published in Forbes, 2016

The year 2030 pops up everywhere in the globalist agenda, including the now-famous WEF-authored headline, “Welcome To 2030: I Own Nothing, Have No Privacy And Life Has Never Been Better,” which gives an idea of where cities are heading.

The story begins, “Welcome to the year 2030. Welcome to my city – or should I say, ‘our city.’ I don’t own anything. I don’t own a car. I don’t own a house. I don’t own any appliances or any clothes.”

It concludes by saying that “All in all, it is a good life;” however, “Once in a while I get annoyed about the fact that I have no real privacy. Nowhere I can go and not be registered. I know that, somewhere, everything I do, think and dream of is recorded. I just hope that nobody will use it against me.”

Internet of Bodies Examples, RAND
Internet of Bodies Examples, RAND Corporation

“My optical, aural, GPS, financial and social data? Have at it. My bodily fluids? Yeah, no thanks” — “Maple’s Story,” a fictional memoir from the 2030s by the WEF

If you’re looking for another globalist perspective on what life in the 2030s could look like, check out “Maple’s Story” from the WEF’s Insight Report published in April, 2021 called “Technology Futures: Projecting the Possible, Navigating What’s Next” for a truly dystopian depiction of urban living in the metaverse.

Here’s a preview:

“Since at least the mid-2020s, medical data has been a particularly hot commodity. For us providers, it’s typically one of the quickest and biggest cash payouts. But selling my data to meds freaks me out. I tell myself it’s for the greater good – you know, helping some do-gooder AI better analyze and respond to new security bugs – but sometimes it keeps me up at night. What’s the cost to me? Who else buys this data from them? And will they use it against me? … Whatever; I need the cash”

Fueling this future of no privacy under a technocratic agenda that collects data on everything a citizen does is the growing ecosystem of connected devices known as the Internet of Things, and by extension — the Internet of Bodies (IoB).

If the “Welcome to 2030” article proves to be prophetic, you won’t own any of these devices.

“The events of 2020 have forever changed the trajectory of IoT and its role in society” — WEF Shaping the Future of Urban Transformation Platform

When talking about smart cities, smart homes, smart phones, etc., “smart” primarily refers to the IoT and IoB ecosystems of digital devices and services that collect and share data across the internet.

According to the WEF’s Shaping the Future of Urban Transformation platform, “The events of 2020 have forever changed the trajectory of IoT and its role in society.”

Another way of looking at it is that the unelected globalists are exploiting the pandemic to usher in their great reset of society and the global economy with help from technologies coming out of the so-called fourth industrial revolution, such as the IoT.

“I know that, somewhere, everything I do, think and dream of is recorded. I just hope that nobody will use it against me” — WEF-authored article published in Forbes, 2016

“Cities and Urbanization” is one of the many tentacles attached to the great reset agenda, which relies heavily on emerging technologies for mass surveillance and data collection.

Cities and Urbanization

Woven into the WEF’s agenda to reset “Cities and Urbanization” are threads relating to:

  • The Fourth Industrial Revolution
  • Blockchain
  • The Internet of Things
  • The Future of Mobility
  • Data Science
  • The Role of Religion
  • Climate Change
  • Green New Deals
  • Global Governance
  • And many more

All threads for Cities and Urbanization are interconnected under the banner of the great reset agenda.

Great Reset “Cities and Urbanization.” Image source: The World Economic Forum

In April, 2016, the WEF published a report called Inspiring Future Cities & Urban Services that lists the top 10 technologies driving urban transformation.

All of these technologies require collecting massive amounts of citizen data, which feeds into a Citizen e-ID, aka “digital identity.”

Between the Internet of Things, location and condition sensing, mobile device-based sensing, mobile health monitoring, and open data in government, etc., what you have is a list of technologies that can be used for either good or ill.

With respect to urban transformation, the WEF says the IoT “offers a means to reimagine and transform physical spaces—our homes, offices, factories, farms, healthcare facilities and public spaces—to be more adaptive, customized and even anticipate new needs before they arise.”

For example, “New applications of IoT – from public health surveillance to global supply chain integration – are delivering enormous benefits while also drawing attention to significant gaps in the governance of these technologies.”

On a macro scale, these technologies can provide tremendous insights and tools that reshape cities in very positive ways, such as more efficient energy usage, better healthcare services, and improved transit systems.

On a more personal level, these technologies can be used to surveil, incentivize, coerce, and manipulate human behavior while eroding fundamental human rights.

Trust is everything.

Triggers and Enablers for Urban Transformation. Image Source: WEF Report: Inspiring Future Cities & Urban Services

The idea is that emerging technologies will act like “triggers” that will “enable” the urban transformation.

Key to this form of massive data collection and surveillance is connecting every citizen with a digital identity.

Digital identity, aka “Citizen e-ID,” is one of the top 10 technologies driving urban transformation, according to the WEF.

The global digital identity agenda picked-up speed throughout 2020, starting with contact tracing and continuing with immunity and vaccine passports to monitor and control citizen mobility for the greater good.

By connecting your every online/offline interaction, your digital identity can be connected to:

  • Every click, comment, and share you make on social media
  • Every financial transaction you record
  • Your location and where you travel
  • What you buy and sell
  • Your personal health data and medical records
  • The websites that you visit
  • Your participation in civic functions (i.e. voting, taxes, benefits, etc.)
  • How much energy you consume
  • And more

Thus, your digital identity can become an account of your social behavior, which can also be policed.

WEF Great Reset Digital ID
Image Source: World Economic Forum

According to a WEF report from 2018, “Our identity is, literally, who we are, and as the digital technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution advance, our identity is increasingly digital.”

“This digital identity determines what products, services and information we can access – or, conversely, what is closed off to us.”

Data captured from people’s phones, smart watches, and other devices is the same type of data that goes into feeding digital identity schemes, which can be used for determining the level of citizen access to goods and services.

The WEF report from 2016 highlights Madrid as a city where data collected was used to “generate a comprehensive view of city services” via a platform that “integrates data from citizens with data captured through sensors, cameras and Internet of Things devices.”

Data is what drives urban transformation, and the ways in which public and private entities can capture and process information are becoming increasingly more intimate.

The Urban Transformation Summit taking place in Detroit from December 6-8 comes on the heels of the WEF’s great narrative meeting in Dubai, where WEF Founder Klaus Schwab called on some 40 unelected globalists to craft a great narrative for humankind in under 48 hours from November 11-12.

Great reset architects to lay ‘urban transformation’ HQ cornerstone in Detroit

WEF Founder Klaus Schwab calls for a ‘great narrative’ for humankind at meeting in Dubai

A timeline of the great reset agenda: from foundation to Event 201 and the pandemic of 2020

The ‘great reset’ meets the Internet of Bodies: manipulating human behavior with authoritarian surveillance

COVID passport mandates are fueling authoritarian social credit systems, digital identity schemes

How to track & trace every person, purchase, and protein on the planet & manipulate human behavior

Your digital identity can be used against you in the event of a great reset

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Tim Hinchliffe
Tim Hinchliffe is the editor of The Sociable. His passions include writing about how technology impacts society and the parallels between Artificial Intelligence and Mythology. Previously, he was a reporter for the Ghanaian Chronicle in West Africa and an editor at Colombia Reports in South America. tim@sociable.co