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So, Google’s Play Store confused its own Nexus 10 with Apple’s iPad

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Oops, here’s an embarrassing one for Google – the big G seems to have copied part of Apple’s iPad terms and conditions for its Nexus 10 terms and conditions (and left in a reference to the iPad in the process).

If you visit Google’s Nexus Store T&C’s page you’ll see this standard warning about the device’s claimed battery life;

“Battery life depends on device settings, usage, and many other factors. Battery tests are conducted using specific Nexus 10 units; actual results may vary. Actual formatted capacity of your device will be less than the memory listed.”

Except that’s not how the line read yesterday.  Yesterday instead of mentioning Google’s Nexus 10, the line mentions another 10 inch tablet – Apple’s iPad.

“Battery life depends on device settings, usage, and many other factors. Battery tests are conducted using specific iPad units; actual results may vary. Actual formatted capacity of your device will be less than the memory listed. ” [emphasis added]

ChangeDetection - Comparison of- Nexus Store on Google Play Terms of Sale

If you’re quick you can still see this error on Bing’s cache of the Google page.  Google’s cache of the page was created on October 28; the reference to the iPad was published on November 6. Here’s a screen grab of the full cached page if you’re interested (Scroll down to the section “Nexus 10 Addendum”).

So why is Google saying its testing the Nexus 10 tablet’s batteries on Apple’s iPad?  We’ll it could be because the line is surprisingly similar to one on Apple’s iPad battery care page.

That page contains the line;

“Battery life depends on device settings, usage, and many other factors. Battery tests are conducted using specific iPad units; actual results may vary.”

Okay, so it’s a small error but not one that Google’s needs right now considering the issues flying between themselves and Apple these days.

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Piers Dillon Scott
Piers Dillon-Scott is co-editor of The Sociable and writes about stuff he finds. He likes technology, media, and using the Oxford comma (because it just makes sense).