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Image of last total lunar eclipse which occurred in December 2010
Science

Longest total lunar eclipse in 11 years will turn moon blood red tonight

The longest total lunar eclipse since 2000 will begin to occur this evening and last until midnight, providing stargazers a rare opportunity to catch this prolonged wonderful spectacle. The eclipse begins at 6.24pm (IST) this evening, although it will not be properly visible until sunset at around 9.55pm tonight, at which stage the moon will turn blood red in colour.
Northern lights as seen from transatlantic flight
Technology

Timelapse video captures northern lights on transatlantic flight

A passenger on board a transatlantic flight from San Francisco to Paris has captured a remarkable timelapse video of the northern lights, or the aurora borealis. During his eleven hour flight he captured 2,459 images, roughly one every two miles, using a Canon 5D Mark II and a tripod, and stitched them together afterward to produce this masterpiece.
Super moon - unifiedphoto
Social Media

Last night’s super moon as captured by Flickr users

Last night’s full moon was the closest it has been to earth for almost twenty years, a mere 356,575 kilometres away. As a result, the moon appeared 14% bigger and 30% brighter than normal, granting photography enthusiasts around the world a rare opportunity to shoot the moon in such inviting circumstances.
International Space Station
Technology

Image of the International Space Station as it orbits sky over Ireland

With clear skies forecast for this week across much of Ireland an excellent opportunity presents itself for amateur astronomers to catch a glimpse of the International Space Station as it orbits earth and passes over Ireland. One such sighting opportunity occurred at 19:53 this evening, and although slightly unprepared, I managed to capture this light trail as the space station hurtled past.
Prosessor Brian Cox and Dara O'Briain who will host Stargazing LIVE
Entertainment

Stargazing with the BBC

The BBC are broadcasting live over three consecutive nights of “extraordinary astronomical events” from across the UK and further afield. Professor Brian Cox (@profbriancox) and comedian Dara O’Briain (@daraobriain) host the live stargazing events that promise “epic images from observatories around the globe”.